Activity Results

  • Results of the Global Math 2015 Contest

    The Global Math 2015 Contest was hosted by EdTech Lab at the Shinjuku Office of Benesse Holdings. We had 11 team entries to Plannning Section, 1 for Design Section, 18 for Prep-Development Section, 16 for Development Section, 4 for TeamWork Section, and 1 for Global Math Dissemination Idea Section. In total, 51 teams entered the contest. Compared to the previous contest entries, the number of this year was tripple. We had the contest participants from aged 10 to adults from outside Tokyo area such as west and north Japan. Contest judges were a professional game creator from Sega Creatives, a math-educators from Waseda University, and a teamwork professional researcher from Nara University. As a result of strict examination, 3 teams unver 18, and 14 teams over 18 were awarded.
    Results of the Global Math 2015 Contest


  • Making the game “Step Robot” was done in the math class at Sakura Elementary School in Sakura-shi, Chiba.

    All the 3rd Grade pupils have been doing Global Math activities since September as math class with ICT. At the end of fiscal year 2016, they created Step Robot which can deepen thinking logically and foreseeing what will happen before action. Each team consisted of three students. They showed good teamwork by dividing their roles, such as moving two robots and rowing a wooden boat in the river on the sheet. Such good team work allowed them to complete the game creation within the time limit. See the movie where three girls are simulating their creation. This is a part of the Step Robot Sakura Elementary School Version. Let's have a try!


  • Implementation of Global Math Contest 2015 & Ideathon

    The briefing for the third Global Math Contest was held. There were 45 attendees from universities, vocational schools and companies. In the Ideathon, teams were formed on the spot and told to plan a Global Math game. Each team then gave a 1-minute presentation about their idea. The winning team was Team “Combine” who created a game called “Sai-Ball”, which comes from ya-Sai (vegetable) Ball. It received high marks because players have to find the rules governing the movement of the Sai Ball through trial and error. The contest facilitated exchanges between participants. Nearly 80% of the participants wrote in the post-event survey that the event heightened their motivation.

  • A special lecture and Global Math game-making seminar was held at Shinagawa Joshi Gakuin

    During Round 2 of a 3-part series of special lectures participants who had no previous experience with Global Math were divided into 6 teams and given the topic “Let’s plan a math game that will cause players from around the world to exclaim ‘This is fun!’”. Even though someone might be able to solve problems, without having any experience creating puzzles, the beginning is always challenging. Participants seemed to realize the joy of working with a team.

  • The primary proposal for Tokyo Design Technology Center (TECH) is up.

    The making of Global Math games was adopted as part of this school’s planning project. Preparations are moving forward to focus the development of Global Math games by sophomores. The primary plan of 29 proposals has been submitted. We are looking forward to seeing how everything turns out.
    Tokyo Design Technology Center, Company Project


  • Special Lecture to Start Global Math at Shinagawa Joshi Gakuin

    A special lecture to launch Global Math was given after school to students who volunteered to participate. This was the third year of the program. 28 middle school students attended. The first time, based on the aim of Global Math to be played as flipped learning, students practiced problem making with SuperShapeShot. The teacher deliberately organized teams to include students from different grades, which had the added benefit of allowing students to widen their circle of friends. There were numerous positive, forward-thinking impressions from the students such as, cooperating with a team to solve problems was a fresh approach, it was good to learn how other teams tackled problems, and the activity required a lot of brain power.
    Shinagawa Joshi Gakuin


    Best game

  • Results on the Practical Application of Global Math as a Development Project for High School Juniors, Presented at the Japan Society for Educational Technology Conference.

    Global Math was used in the Informatics class for high school juniors at the Tokyo Gakugei University International Secondary School. The findings obtained from practical implementation were presented during the Japan Society for Educational Technology 31st National Convention held at the University of Electro-Communications. In the project-oriented game development class it was found that a lot could be learned through teamwork.
    the Japan Society for Educational Technology


  • Global Math booth at the Japanese Society for the Study on Teacher Education

    Global Math had a booth during the Japanese Society for the Study on Teacher Education 25th Research Conference held at Shinshu University. A high school teacher from Kyushu said she was glad she made the trip to Nagano. She returned to Kyushu with a Global Math training kit and SuperShapeShot.
    the Japanese Society for the Study on Teacher Education


  • Presented how Global Math is being used at school and its significance at Business and Produce Session, the Computer Entertainment Developers Conference 2015.

    Five years have passed since the creation of Global Math, which ushered in a new way of studying by combining an understanding of education and gaming. It has been three years since the start of the pilot platform and two years have passed since the beginning of the current platform. Many game developers, who had focused mainly on games for entertainment purposes, became interested in games which contribute to education, which has had a profound effect.
    CEDEC2015 “3 Years of Experiments Using “Global Math”, Mathematical Games Designed for Education, And Expectations for the Gaming Industry”


  • GLOBAL MATH was introduced to schoolteachers at the 91st Hands-on Math meeting.

    The Hands-on Math Study Group, established to think about and enjoy math using hand activities, provides an opportunity for schoolteachers, math educators, puzzle creators, and others to exchange ideas. At the 91st meeting, the SuperShapeShot hands-on game was introduced. School teachers were glad to hear that GLOBAL MATH team-work activities do not require individual computer use, but enable students to learn mathematical thinking skills by exchanging ideas at school or at home.
    the Japan Society of Mathematical Education


  • A Teacher Training Workshop in Chiba Prefecture was held to Discuss Incorporating Global Math into Lesson Plans

    The Chiba General Education Center sponsored a workshop entitled "Using Tablet Computers for Training in Collaborative Learning", to discuss using Global Math in the classroom. 80 teachers of special needs students, from elementary through high school, gathered a total of three times. There were many rich proposals such as the trial and error method used to learn the rules of Global Math games being used in English and Japanese language classes to foster communication, and in physical education classes, it would be good to have students move their bodies according to rules of the games.


  • Global Math put up a display booth at ISTE2015, Philladelphia, USA

    Global Math had a booth at ISTE2015 in Philadelphia, in the United States, which is the biggest conference in the world in the field of education technology. Global Math games intentionally explain as little as possible about the rules so that players are encouraged to think and reason by trial and error. As we expected, people attending the conference found many unique solutions. Also, 11-year-old students from Mexico who visited our booth took part in the SuperShapeShot workshop. Even though they only speak a little English as a second language, they were able to understand what to do from just a few instructions. They created interesting and unique problems.
    ISTE2015


    Picture


  • A Global Math game play corner was set up at the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, USA

    Global Math set up a game play corner on a day when admission to the museum was free of charge. The corner was incredibly popular with kids and parents forming a long line to wait their turn to play. More than 3000 people visited the museum which is three times a normal day's attendees. Even after we told them that they could play the game at home, many people said they wanted to play the game there and we could hear their shrieks of joy as they played. Having American kids play the Global Math games was a great pleasure for Global Math creators.
    The Tech Museum of Innovation


    Picture


  • A SuperShapeShot workshop was held at the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, USA

    Six groups of families took part in the SuperShapeShot workshop at the Tech Museum of Innovation. We didn't have to use onomatopoeia to explain the word "Rotate", because it is a common word for American kids. They enjoyed creating their own game.
    The Tech Museum of Innovation


    Picture


  • Results of the Global Math 2014 Contest

    The Global Math 2014 Contest was held at the office of Benesse Holdings in Shinjuku. There were six categories to compete in this year. Seventeen teams with members ranging from junior high school students to college students entered in three of six possible sections; the Planning section, the Pre-Development section, and the Development section. All teams were awarded prizes while 9 teams received special commendations. You can see the full list of results here. Professional game developers and math experts were invited as judges. Their comments along with the other teams’ exciting games and presentations undoubtedly inspired the participants to want to enter next year’s contest.


  • GLOBAL MATH platform is linked to the DiGRA web site.

    DiGRA, Digital Games Research Association is a non-profit international conference for game research. In addition to entertainment games, much research is now focused on so-called “serious games” or games for learning. We hope that the link will encourage greater interest in GLOBAL MATH game creation.


  • The GLOBAL MATH team gave feedback on twenty-nine game plans proposed by teams from Tokyo University of Technology (TUT) for entry in the Development Section of the GLOBAL MATH 2014 contest.

    TUT students create fun games, and the Benesse Global Math Team provides advice from the perspective of math education to facilitate their use in the classroom. We look forward to the development of Global Math games that go beyond entertainment to nurture mathematical thinking skills.


  • GLOBAL MATH was introduced to schoolteachers at the 91st Hands-on Math meeting.

    The Hands-on Math Study Group, established to think about and enjoy math using hand activities, provides an opportunity for schoolteachers, math educators, puzzle creators, and others to exchange ideas. At the 91st meeting, the SuperShapeShot hands-on game was introduced. School teachers were glad to hear that GLOBAL MATH team-work activities do not require individual computer use, but enable students to learn mathematical thinking skills by exchanging ideas at school or at home.


  • The Benesse Global Math team had a discussion with a graduate student from Graduate Certificate eLearning Design, University of Georgia.

    Graduate students studying Instructional Product Evaluation at the University of Georgia conducted a survey of teen age groups in the US regarding how they feel about Global Math.

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    The Global Math team had an online meeting with one of the graduate students and discussed the survey. She pointed out the insufficient rule explanations of Global Math games, but was told that Global Math games intentionally explain very little so that players can guess the rules through trial and error. After the concept was explained, she agreed that it could be beneficial. However, she mentioned that the term “game” might not be accepted by school teachers in the US.
    Graduate Certificate eLearning Design, University of Georgia


  • The Benesse Global Math team had a discussion with an Adjunct Professor from CREATE, NYU.

    An adjunct professor from NYU CREATE visited the creators’ orientation meeting in Tokyo, and exchanged ideas with Global Math members. He has gathered objective data of brain waves from players’ brains to test reactions when they play a game wearing a head set with brain wave sensors. imbedded in it. We will apply this brain research to a Global Math game and will see how the players will react when play. We will expect some findings about how games works for learning.
    Consortium for Research and Evaluation of Advanced Technologies in Education, New York University

  • The design of the Global Math (β) platform was renewed.

    The Global Math platform (β) renewed its design so that players and creators would feel more comfortable and more connected. This renewal affords creators games on tablet computers, too.
    Global Math game platform β


  • An orientation meeting for creators was held.

    The Global Math orientation meeting for the Global Math 2014 was held at Benesse Holdings’ office in Shinjuku, targeting creators for “Development Section”.

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    There were over 20 participants from several universities. The program included contest explanation, self-introduction activities (ice-breakers), and how games should be developed, as well as new features of the platform, such as developing for tablet computers. After the meeting, participants exchanged ideas. We strongly call for your entry of Global Math 2014. The documents presented at the Global Math orientation meeting will be open to the public very soon.


  • An article about an elementary school which introduced Global Math Super Shape Shot to a fifth grade math class appeared in the Mainichi Newspaper on December 23, 2014.

    An article in the Mainichi Newspaper wrote about Super Shape Shot of Global Math on December 23, 2014. The article was entitled “Let’s study with digital materials, Spatial Understanding will be Improved Through Game Creation” and described a class in the Arakawa Ward of Tokyo. Shioiri Higashi Elementary School fifth graders tried “Super Shape Shot” in eight groups.


  • A group representing a laboratory from the Gaming Division of the Tokyo Polytechnic University made an algorithm applying the concept of a matrix in the Development Section at the Global Math 2014 Preliminary Contest.

    A rubric of Global Math 2014 puts more priority on algorithm in programming games. The game "Calc Fight" got Certificate of Matrix as it produced numbers in the game based on the concept of tridiagonal matrix.

  • A group from a laboratory at the School of Media Science at Tokyo University of Technology chose "probability" as their theme and held the Global Math 2014 Preliminary Contest "Planning Section."

    Twenty students drew their idea of games to learn probability on a sheet of paper. Five of them were selected by peer evaluation. The certificate of outstanding performance will be given to an idea where a player can make a decision by extracting some given information.

  • Faculty of Education in the Department of Educational Science at Shinshu University held the Global Math 2014 Preliminary Contest "Planning Section."

    About 80 prospective teachers of elementary school science and social studies took part in the Global Math 2014 Preliminary Contest "Planning Section".

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    They tried the Super Shape Shot at the previous lecture and understood what game they will create. At the contest, each four-student team gave a presentation about their games, which were created after spending two weeks considering their task. The prospective teachers showed their potential by understanding both the educational goals as well as the children's interests when developing their game.

  • An Information Class at Tokyo Gakugei University International Secondary School held the Global Math 2014 Preliminary Contest "Prep Development Section."

    Eighteen 17-year-old students gave presentations about their games in the Preliminary Contest "Prep Development Section", which marked the halfway point of the Information Class (an elective course) which began in September 2014.

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    The students created a new game modifying the code of "Super Shape Shot". They added new rules, designed the user interface (UI), changed the way of moving, invented a new way of keeping score and made an entirely new game. Based on their knowledge through the eight lectures on Java Script so far, most of students learned more on the net in accordance with their new game ideas. The teacher commented "The students worked even harder than I thought they would". They are going to polish their performance with an eye towards entering the final contest.

  • Making the game “Super Shape Shot” was done in the math class at Shioiri Higashi Elementary School in Arakawa Ward, Tokyo.

    A teacher from this school gave a math lecture to 5th Grade pupils introducing Super Shape Shot which can deepen understanding of the concept of congruence.

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    Each team consisted of four students. They showed good teamwork by dividing their roles, such as thinking how to move the shot, taking a note, and pasting the shot on the sheet. Such good team work allowed them to complete the game creation within the time limit. Some tried to create a game with rotation movement only. Others thought deeper than expected.

  • Global Math2014 Preliminary Contest "Planning Section" in special lectures after school at Shinagawa Joshi Gakuin

    Global Math was invited to give a special lecture after school, which was open to those who were interested.

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    Girls 14 and 16 attended the class. All of the 16-year-olds were second time participants. Lectures were given as a series of four sessions. During the last lecture, six teams made eight-minute presentations about their game idea in front of judges. The NaNaNaNa-Choco Banana Team, who planned a game entitled “Math Expression Coordination,” got the Certificate of Outstanding Performance. After the lecture, they made comments like, "We thought hard about math while planning the game idea,” “The activity made it easy for us to study math” and “It was fun to create a game.”

  • An information class at Tokyo Gakugei University International Secondary School gave a coding lesson on Global Math "Super Shape Shot".

    Since September 2014, a teacher at the school has been using the Global Math creator program for his information class (elective course).

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    A lecturer from Benesse explained the basics of JavaScript. The lecture was designed for students to create a digital game based on "Super Shape Shot" where players move shapes. Most of the students learned JavaScript for the first time, and they asked many interesting questions.
    Tokyo Gakugei University International Secondary School

  • The Super Shape Shot game was played in Math class at Minami Ikebukuro Elementary School in the Toshima Ward of Tokyo.

    In two 5th grade math classes , the class teachers showed the students how to play Super Shape Shot. There are three movements - Parallel, Rotation, and Line-symmetric displacement.

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    These are difficult concepts for the pupils. The teachers used simple words to explain the game to the students so that everybody understood. One pupil found 16 solutions for a question that another team created. She seemed delighted to have done so well.

  • The educational value of Global Math was presented during two sessions at a world-famous conference, CEDEC2014. One was an Academic and Basic Technology session, and the other was a Production session.

    The conference was held at Pacifico Yokohama. It was a joint presentation with Kishimoto Laboratory of Tokyo University of Technology.

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    His students exhibited 10 Global Math games at a booth entitled “Trial of Global Math games, played by people from around the world”. People enjoyed playing the games at the booth.
    At the other session, a presentation entitled “How Educational Games could Contribute to Society” was given which included two examples. One was Japan’s first “serious game jam” for practicing English, and the other was Trial of Global Math for world-wide users.
    Usually kids like playing games because they are not educational. A question “How can a game be educational?” was posed at the session. Many developers want to try to create new games which are both educational and entertaining.
    http://cedec.cesa.or.jp/2014/session/AC/1554.html
    http://cedec.cesa.or.jp/2014/session/BP/4840.html
    http://www.inside-games.jp/article/2014/09/05/80278.html

  • The Super Shape Shot game creation workshop was sponsored by the Math Department of Tsuda College in Tokyo which was celebrating the 150th anniversary of the birth of the founder Umeko Tsuda.

    The Math Department of Tsuda College hosted the Global Math game creation workshop for 10-12 year-olds living in Kodaira-shi where the college is located. This workshop is held as part of the celebration project honoring the 150th anniversary of Umeko Tsuda’s birth.

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    The object of the game is to move a shape from the start to the goal in the shortest route using a certain movement. The creators can make several questions, change the positions of the start and the goal, and various kinds of movement which players can use. Some kids were surprised to find that there were more than two correct answers to a single question. Other kids were respected because they found answers which even the creators of the question hadn’t considered. Kids usually believe a question has only one answer. So, the game surprised them very much.
    You can refer to the Tsuda College web site for more details
    https://www.facebook.com/TsudaCollege/posts/1521998358029162

  • The Human Sorting Algorithm workshop trial was held in Math class at Shioiri Higashi Elementary School in Arakawa Ward, Tokyo.

    A teacher from this school made aprogram which would allow students to experience firsthand in math class what a sorting algorhithm does.

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    The teacher asked his pupils to choose a big card, and to think about a command to move each person with the card so that those cards will put in order. A computer can only follow the commands a human gives it. This fact interested a lot of pupils.
    Here is a link to Shioiri Higashi Elementary School in Arakawa Ward.

  • Benesse Global Math team had a discussion with a researcher from MIT Media Lab

    A researcher from MIT Media Lab visited the office of Benesse Holdings in Shinjuku and had a discussion with the Benesse Global Math team.

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    Our mother tongues were different, but we did not use verbal communication tools much. Instead we drew symbols, shapes, and numbers on the white board during the meeting. This is exactly what Global Math is all about. We can exchange ideas with each other using symbols, shapes, and numbers any place in the world. We hope to offer such chances for all young people both in Japan and in the rest of the world.

  • Separating red-and-white sticky buns game workshop was held at Galaxcity in Adachi Ward .

    Tokyo University of Technology (TUT) and the Benesse Global Math team jointly held a workshop where players divide eight red-and-white buns of various sizes into two groups by a certain standard.

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    We had meetings several time before the workshop, and created the game rules and how to proceed. TUT led the workshop on the day for kids aged 10-12. TUT students designed the workshop introducing gamification, such as a competition between two groups, a time limit for thinking, and so forth. We realized such gamification in the process can make pupils concentrate on the activity. This game looks easy at first glance, but it is truly difficult if they really make wise positions so that more answers will be applied. Many pupils enjoyed the fact that this game made them thin.
    Here is a link to the Galaxcity web site.
    You can refer to TUT web site for more detail.(TUT Department of MediaTUT)

  • Math class introduced the LOGIQ at Minami Ikebukuro Elementary School in Toshima Ward, Tokyo.

    The Benesse Global Math team gave a math lecture to 6th Grade pupils introducing LOGIQ which can deepen understanding of the concept of an unfolded cube.

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    At the beginning of the class, pupils reviewied unfolded cubes which they learned in 4th Grade. Then, they began to play LOGIQ. Each student played a game at his/her own pace at first. Later they helped each other how to find a solution. We realized this game is more suitable for collaborative learning than traditional note-and-text learning. After the class, some said “It was fun to think,” others said “I understood the concept we learned in 4th Grade more with this game.”
    You can read an article of the class at the Benesse Educational Research and Development Institute web site.

  • Results of the Global Math 2013 Contest

    The Global Math 2013 Contest was held at the offices of Benesse Corporation in Shinjuku. There were three categories to compete in, the Planning section, the Game Design section, and the Game Development section.

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    Twenty-seven teams with members aged 14 to adult, took part in the contest, and 10 teams were awarded prizes. Professional game developers and math experts were invited as judges. Their comments on each performance inspired the participants.
    You can get more details at the Global Math 2013 contest page.

  • Math classes introduced the Magic of the Hat and Cut into the Part at Minami Ikebukuro Elementary School in Toshima Ward

    The school providedevery student with a tablet computer in February, 2014. Two 4th Grade classes and a 5th Grade class introduced the “Magic of the Hat” and “Cut into the Part” respectively in their math class. Each teacher planned a lesson with those games very well so that pupils understood the math concepts.

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    The Magic of the Hat includes a linear function which doesn’t pass the origin, which 8th Grade students learn in middle school. We thought it must be difficult for 4th Grade pupils to find the relationship, but they took notes on scratch paper while listening to the teacher’s thoughtful hints and successfully found a solution. The Cut into the Part game is introduced to make the concept of proportions understood from a different point of view from the math text book.

  • A briefing session on Global Math 2013 Creators was held.

    The Benesse Global Math team hosted a briefing session on Global Math 2013 Creators at the offices of Benesse Corporation in Tama so that creators could enter the contest.

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    More than 20 colleges took part in the session. The purpose of Global Math, requirements of Global Math games, and rules of development were explained.
    You can watch videos of the session here.

  • The first prize winner at Shinagawa Joshi Gakuin designed their game with professional game developers.

    The Math Addiction Team planned a game entitled “Pinball Catchers Turtle” and got the first prize at the Shinagawa Joshi Gakuin in-house contest. The team consisted of four girls all aged 14. They were challenged to write a game design document for professional game developers.

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    Their supervisor found a change in some of the students before and after the activity. One student tends to ask “Why?” in any subject and she said “It is fun when I understand math because I didn’t like math before.”

  • The workshop “Let’s create a math game!” was held at Risupia.

    Tokyo University of Technology (TUT) and the Benesse Global Math team jointly held a workshop where elementary kids aged 10-12 planned new math games. In the morning, TUT students performed a sketch to promote the importance of Math.

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    In the afternoon, selected parents and kids drew a game plan on blank sheets guided by students. At the end, each student made a presentation about his/her idea on the sheet. Kishimoto of TUT made a comment on each presentation.

  • Global Math in special lectures after school at Shinagawa Joshi Gakuin

    Global Math was invited to give a special lecture after school, which was open to those who were interested.

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    Girls 14 to 16 who don’t like math but are interested in games, attended the class. Lectures were a series of four sessions. During the last lecture, five teams made a presentation about their game idea on a sheet in front of judges. The Math Addiction Team, who planned a game entitled “Pinball Catchers Turtle,” got the first prize.
    The principal mentioned the lecture in her Principal’s Diary on the web.

  • Educational game platform “Global Math beta” was released

    Global Math platform beta, where games to nurture mathematical thinking skills are uploaded, was released.

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    Players can read their playing history and nine thinking skills defined by Global Math were measured on “my page.” Creators can upload their own games which fulfills Global Math game requirements for the platform. Both can register with the platform free of charge.
    Here is a link to more details about Global Math beta.

  • Summer workshop entitled “Let’s Create a Math Game!” was held at Benesse.

    Tokyo University of Technology (TUT) and the Benesse Global Math team jointly held a workshop where elementary kids aged 9-13 planned new math games. Kids made some groups of two and a student facilitated the group.

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    Kids drew their idea for math games on a blank sheet of paper from scratch. A 9 year old girl felt nervous when she made a presentation about her game in front of a big audience which included several age groups. Professor Kishimoto gave an useful comment on her idea and it gave her confidence. She kept thinking on the way back home and asked her mother for paper to write her additional ideas. Many parents liked the concept of thinking about new things from scratch, drawing ideas on a blank sheet.